Calendar Event: Snow Sports

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DateFriday, January 19, 2018
Start TimeTBD
End DateSunday, January 21, 2018
End TimeTBD
Calendar GroupTroop792
Last updated by Viarengo on Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 09:02 PM. Update Delete

Schedule:

  • Friday night, any time: Arrive in Verdi, Nv. (address provided via e-mail)
  • 6:00 AM Saturday: Oatmeal breakfast (with fruit)
  • 6:30 AM Saturday: Depart for Northstar
  • 11:00 AM Saturday: Everyone in the group meets up at "mid mountain" (some place at NorthStar)
  • Saturday evening: barbecue (meat, garlic bread, salad)
  • Sunday morning: custom omelettes


Costs:

  • estimate for Saturday breakfast and dinner and Sunday breakfast: $25.00
  • Buy your lift tickets online and get the lowest price guarantee! Purchase tickets 7 days or more in advance for the biggest savings. Purchase tickets up to midnight the night before you ski and still save money off the regular ticket window price.
  • Rent your equipment if necessary at Northstar or other places
  • $15 if not driving
  • lunch at Northstar


confirmed:

  • Aidan V. (C790), dad (leaving Gilroy at 1:00)
  • Joey (riding with Mr. V.), dad (already in Verdi)
  • Anthony (riding with Mr. V.)
  • Andrew, brother, dad (already have season tickets so not part of group discount if we get it)
  • Thomas, dad (already have season tickets so not part of group discount if we get it) (will meet at slopes, not at the house)
  • Lucas, dad
  • Nicholas, brother, dad (already have season tickets so not part of group discount if we get it)
  • Peter-Hendry (riding with Mr. C.)
  • Cody, sister, dad, sister's friend


Bring:

  • Snow Sports MB card, worksheet, and pen
  • sleeping bag and pad
  • pillow
  • toiletries (including soap, shampoo, and kleenex)
  • day pack
  • sunscreen
  • water bottle
  • appropriate ski clothing including
    • jacket
    • snow boots
    • gloves and or mittens
    • extra socks
    • scarf
    • warm clothes
  • sunglasses and or goggles
  • cash for
    • lunch at North Star (your estimate)
    • food at house ($25.00)
    • incidentals (your estimate)
    • $15 if not driving
  • any necessary med's


Click here for the Snow Sports MB pamphlet.

Snow Sports MB requirements:
1. Do the following:
a. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while participating in snow sport activities, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
b. Discuss first aid and prevention for the types of injuries or illnesses that could occur while participating in snow sports, including hypothermia, frostbite, shock, dehydration, sunburn, fractures, bruises, sprains, and strains. Tell how to apply splints.
2. Do the following:
a. Explain why every snow sport participant should he prepared to render first aid in the event of an accident.
b. Explain the procedure used to report an accident to the local ski patrol for the area where you usually ski, ride, or snowshoe.
3. Explain the international trail-marking system.
4. Discuss the importance of strength, endurance, and flexibility in snow sports. Demonstrate exercises and activities you can do to get fit for the option you choose in requirement 7.
5. Present yourself properly clothed and equipped for the option you choose in requirement 7. Discuss how the clothing you have chosen will help keep you warm and protected.
6. Do EACH of the following:
a. Tell the meaning of the Your Responsibility Code for skiers, snowboarders, and snowshoers. Explain why each rider must follow this code.
b. Explain the Smart Style safety program. Tell why it is important and how it applies to participants at snow sport venues like terrain parks and pipes.
c. Explain the precautions pertaining to avalanche safety, including the responsibility of individuals regarding avalanche safety.
d. Tell the meaning of the Wilderness Use Policy. Explain why each skier and snowboarder must adopt this policy.
7. Complete ALL of the requirements for ONE of the following options: downhill (Alpine) skiing OR cross-country (Nordic) OR snowboarding OR snowshoeing.
Downhill (Alpine) Skiing Option
a. Show how to use and maintain your own release bindings and explain the use of two others. Explain the international DIN standard and what it means to skiers.
b. Explain the American Teaching System and a basic snow-skiing progression.
c. Discuss the five types of Alpine skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
d. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
e. On a gentle slope, demonstrate some of the beginning maneuvers learned in skiing. Include the straight run, gliding wedge, wedge stop, sidestep, and herringbone maneuvers.
f. On slightly steeper terrain, show linked wedge turns.
g. On a moderate slope, demonstrate five to 10 christies.
h. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following:
1. Short-, medium-, and long-radius parallel turns
2. A sideslip and safety (hockey) stop to each side
3. Traverse across a slope
i. Demonstrate the ability to ski in varied conditions, including changes in pitch, snow conditions, and moguls. Maintain your balance and ability to turn.
j. Name the major ski organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
Cross-Country (Nordic) Skiing Option
a. Show your ability to select, use, and repair, if necessary, the correct equipment for ski touring in safety and comfort.
b. Discuss classical and telemark skis. Demonstrate two ways to carry skis and poles safely and easily.
c. Discuss the basic principles of waxing for cross-country ski touring.
d. Discuss the differences between cross-country skiing, ski touring, ski mountaineering, and downhill skiing.
e. List the items you would take on a one-day ski tour.
f. Demonstrate the proper use of a topographic map and compass.
g. On a gentle, packed slope, show some basic ways to control speed and direction. Include the straight run, traverse, side slip, step turn, wedge stop, and wedge turn maneuvers.
h. On a cross-country trial, demonstrate effective propulsion by showing proper weight transfer form ski to ski, pole timing, rhythm, flow, and glide.
i. Demonstrate your ability, on a tour, to cope with an average variety of snow conditions.
j. Demonstrate several methods of dealing with steep hills or difficult conditions. Include traverses and kick turns going uphill and downhill, sidesteps, pole drag, and ski-pole "glissade."
Snowboarding Option (not offered by our counselors at this event)
a. Discuss forward-fall injuries.
b. Show your ability to select the correct equipment for snowboarding and to use it for safety and comfort.
c. Show how to use and maintain your own bindings, and explain the use of the different binding methods. Explain the need for leashes.
d. Discuss the four types of snowboards. Demonstrate how to carry a snow-board easily and safely.
e. Demonstrate how to ride one kind of lift and explain how to ride two others.
f. Demonstrate the basic principles of waxing a snowboard.
g. Do the following:
1. On a gentle slope, demonstrate beginning snowboarding maneuvers. Show basic ways to control speed and direction. Include the side slipping maneuver.
2. On slightly steeper terrain, show traversing.
h. On a moderate slope, demonstrate an ollie, a nose-end grab, and a wheelie.
i. Make a controlled run down an intermediate slope and demonstrate the following:
1. Skidded, carved, and jump turns
2. Stops
3. Riding fakie
j. Demonstrate your ability to ride in varied conditions, including changes in pitch, snow conditions, and moguls. Maintain your balance and ability to turn.
k. Name the major snowboarding organizations in the United States and explain their functions.
Snowshoeing Option (not offered by our counselors at this event)
a. Name the parts of a snowshoe.
b. Explain how to choose the correct size of snowshoe.
c. Describe the different types of snowshoes and their specialized uses. Discuss factors to consider when choosing a snowshoe.
d. Explain how to properly care for and maintain snowshoes.
e. Describe how to make an emergency snowshoe.
f. Describe areas that are best for snowshoeing. Discuss some advantages and dangers of backcountry snowshoeing.
g. Discuss the benefits of snowshoeing.
h. Demonstrate the most efficient ways to break trail, climb uphill, travel downhill and traverse a slope.
i. Take a two-mile snowshoe hike with a buddy or your troop.
j. Demonstrate your ability, on a hike, to cope with an average variety of snow conditions.


Winter Sports (Ranger Award elective) requirements:

  • 1. Be familiar with cold weather-related injuries and how to avoid and treat them.

Requirement

  • 2. Know and explain the safety codes for your chosen winter sport (alpine skiing, Nordic skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, or ice skating). Example: Skier's Responsibility Code found in the National Ski Areas Association Classroom Guide for skier education, published by the National Ski Patrol.

Requirement

  • 3. Design a 30-day physical fitness and stretching program that will prepare you for your chosen winter sport, including exercising and stretching for at least 30 minutes three times a week for 30 days.
  • Choose one of the following winter sports and complete the requirements for that sport.

Alpine Skiing

  • 1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational ski sessions totaling 40 hours.
  • 2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult ski counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, skiing various types of ski terrain, including moguls.
  • 3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner skiers. Teach them basic turns and stops.
  • 4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on alpine skiing.

Nordic (cross country) Skiing

  • 1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational ski sessions totaling 40 hours.
  • 2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult ski counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, skiing all types of ski terrain, and that you can use a map and compass while skiing.
  • 3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner Nordic skiers.
  • 4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout

Snowboarding

  • 1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational snowboarding sessions totaling 40 hours.
  • 2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult snowboarding counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, snowboarding all types of ski terrain, including jumps and other boarding maneuvers.
  • 3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner snowboarders.
  • 4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on snowboarding.

Snowmobiling

  • 1. During a winter season, participate in at least six recreational snowmobiling sessions totaling 40 hours.
  • 2. On one of your ski trips, demonstrate to the adult snowmobiling counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport, snowmobiling all types of terrain, and that you can navigate using maps and compass to plan and carry out a trip.
  • 3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner snowmobilers.
  • 4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on snowmobiling.

Ice Skating

  • 1. Participate in at least 10 recreational skating sessions totaling 40 hours.
  • 2. On one of your skating trips, demonstrate to the adult skating counselor approved by your Advisor that you are proficient in this sport.
  • 3. Give instruction and assistance to a group of beginner skaters.
  • 4. Make a tabletop display or presentation for your crew, another crew, a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another youth group on ice skating.


information from conversation with rep at Northstar in early November:

  • Group rate for Jan. 20 is $105/person (19+), 86.00 ages 13-18, but need 20 people.
    • can also get a "group gondola ticket" to mid-mtn lodge for 23.00 to hit the 20-person minimum
    • if the entire group cancels, they will refund, but must be purchased in advance
  • arrive by 8:15 at the latest
  • they are open 8:30 (mid-mtn) til 4:00
  • advance sales are 125 for adults
  • park in Village View a-k, or if full, in Castle Peak. Take shuttle to "village."


water jugs hot choc' butter paper towels paper plates napkins dish soap bananas tangerines

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